Community Matters Resources

On this page, you will find the resources provided by our guest speakers at YWCA Hartford Region's Community Matters events, as well as additional resources dealing with those topics. When possible, we have added audio/visual components such as Powerpoints, slides, or videos of the event itself.

Disparity of Discipline for Girls of Color Part 2 (March 28, 2018)

A panel discussion about school push-out and the narrative surrounding status offenses and structural discrimination for young women of color and about steps towards solutions. 

Panelists featured:
Subira Gordon, Executive Director of the Commission on Equity and Opportunity
Mario Florez, Director of School Climate and Culture at Hartford Public Schools
Leon Smith, Esq., Director of The Racial Justice Project at the Center for Children's Advocacy
Cheryl Sharp, Esq., Deputy Director of The Commission on Human Rights and Opportunities

Moderator:
Jaleith Gary, Director of Philanthropy, Urban Alliance


Disparity of Discipline for Girls of Color (January 24, 2018)

A panel discussion generating awareness of the gendered consequences of disciplinary and push-out policies for girls of color and how this leads to underachievement and criminalization. 

Panelists featured: 
Stephanie Milan, Associate Professor of Psychology at the UCONN Center for the Study of Culture, Health, and Human Development
Terrell Hill, Assistant Superintendent for Human Resources, Windsor Public Schools
Eboné Daire, High School Senior at Metropolitan Learning Center, Bloomfield
Jada Harrison,  High School Senior at Metropolitan Learning Center, Bloomfield

Moderator: 
Chion Wolf, producer and announcer, WNPR in Hartford, CT

 

  • Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s acclaimed Racism without Racists documents how, beneath our contemporary conversation about race, there lies a full-blown arsenal of arguments, phrases, and stories that whites use to account for—and ultimately justify—racial inequalities. The fifth edition of this provocative book makes clear that color blind racism is as insidious now as ever. It features new material on our current racial climate, including the Black Lives Matter movement; a significantly revised chapter that examines the Obama presidency, the 2016 election, and Trump’s presidency; and a new chapter addressing what readers can do to confront racism—both personally and on a larger structural level.

  • In The American Non-Dilemma, sociologist Nancy DiTomaso convincingly argues that America's enduring racial divide is sustained more by whites' preferential treatment of members of their own social networks than by overt racial discrimination. Drawing on research from sociology, political science, history, and psychology, as well as her own interviews with a cross-section of non-Hispanic whites, DiTomaso provides a comprehensive examination of the persistence of racial inequality in the post-Civil Rights era and how it plays out in today's economic and political context.

  • Giving an overview of Connecticut public education at a glance, this state-run site provides accountability for school districts and administrators in each school district.

  • Co-developed by the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies and the African American Policy Forum

  • Fight for Our Girls

    Through the Fight for Our Girls series, the Center for the Study of Social Policy's (CSSP) Alliance for Racial Equity in Child Welfare seeks to radically shift the narrative surrounding girls of color and status offenses from a focus on deliquency and misbehavior to structural discrimination, trauma and youth well-being. Released over the next year, the series of briefs will promote programs, policies and initiatives aimed at developing a trauma-informed approach to addressing status offenses and supporting the ability of girls of color to thrive.
    Read the first brief: https://www.cssp.org/reform/child-welfare/alliance/fight-for-our-girls-status-offenses.pdf
    Read the second report: https://www.cssp.org/reform/child-welfare/alliance/fight-for-our-girls-intersectionality.pdf

  • Girlhood Interrupted: The Erasure of Black Girls’ Childhood
    Created by Rebecca Epstein, Jamilia Blake, Thalia González
    Center on Poverty and Inequality
    Georgetown Law

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